Symphony Hotel & Restaurant

Symphony Hotel & Restaurant Restored 1871 townhome transformed into a Boutique Hotel & Restaurant. Composer-Themed Rooms, New-American Food, Serving Dinner and Live Jazz.
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Historic Boutique Hotel and Restaurant, located in the popular historic Over the Rhine ... 9 musical themed rooms each named after a famous composer, musical furnishings and period antiques. Overnight includes breakfast. Hotel open 24/7. The Symphony Hotel and Restaurant features contemporary, seasonal New-American cuisine in a setting that combines stunning Italianate architecture with elegant hi

Historic Boutique Hotel and Restaurant, located in the popular historic Over the Rhine ... 9 musical themed rooms each named after a famous composer, musical furnishings and period antiques. Overnight includes breakfast. Hotel open 24/7. The Symphony Hotel and Restaurant features contemporary, seasonal New-American cuisine in a setting that combines stunning Italianate architecture with elegant hi

Payment Options:   Amex Cash Discover Mastercard Visa

Culinary Team: Chef: Tonya McGriff

Operating as usual

We’re excited to announce we’ve partnered with Norden Supporters Group to truly create an FCC pre-game experience like n...
06/11/2021

We’re excited to announce we’ve partnered with Norden Supporters Group to truly create an FCC pre-game experience like no other.

Make sure to stop by next Saturday (6/19) to our pop-up Biergarten for FCC’s next home game!

Check out the events section of our page for details and we’ll see you there 😎

Norden SG is proud to announce a FC Cincinnati matchday partnership with the historic Symphony Hotel & Restaurant
as our home for a pregame Biergarten for every match. The collaboration includes our partners Grainworks Brewing Company
and Highgrain Brewing Co selections from their beer truck. We are so happy to have a FC Cincinnati match day home for 2021! Stop by next Saturday to say hi!

Have you checked this out?
05/28/2021
(1) New Message: FCC PreGame Party

Have you checked this out?

Saturday, May 29th opens Noon Our Home Made Biergarten Fare and HighGrain Draft Beer is the buz before FC Cincinnati games. HighGrain Brewery Isar Weiss Hefeweizen Lusen Pilsner Graf Mexican Lime Lag

05/19/2021

The Symphony Restaurant is currently lookin to hire an experienced Line Cook for Thursdays, Friday’s and Saturday’s.
Experience is a MUST.

Ideal Candidate will be:
dependable, outgoing, energetic, honest, and experienced, and able to work under pressure in a fast paced environment without sacrificing quality of service.

Must be able to pass a background check.

Cover letters and Resumes may be emailed to; [Email hidden]

Or for more information please TEXT;
513-295-3430
Or
513-290-6941

We look toward to hearing from you!

04/14/2021
Starting to look, and feel, like Springtime here at #TheSymphonyHotel&Restaurant#thisisotr #spring2021 #historichotels #...
04/14/2021

Starting to look, and feel, like Springtime here at #TheSymphonyHotel&Restaurant
#thisisotr #spring2021 #historichotels #thequeencity #tulips #cincinnati #cincy #hotel #restaurant #overtherhine

Ever wonder what our 9 composer themed hotel rooms look like?Or, maybe you're planning a small private event and just ar...
03/30/2021
Symphony Hotel & Restaurant

Ever wonder what our 9 composer themed hotel rooms look like?
Or, maybe you're planning a small private event and just aren't sure if our dining rooms will be a good fit?

Click the link below to find those answers and more by taking the virtual tour of our entire property here at Symphony Hotel & Restaurant!!

You can explore all 9 rooms, our formal dining rooms, bar and jazz lounge, fireplace lounge, the history room- even our rooftop deck!

Many thanks to Threshold 360 for capturing our space, and to Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau for making this possible!!!

Symphony Hotel & Restaurant - A Threshold 360 Virtual Tour brought to you by Cincy USA.

03/17/2021

The Symphony Restaurant is currently looking to hire an experienced Line Cook for Thursdays, Friday’s and Saturday’s.
Experience is a MUST.

Ideal Candidate will be:
dependable, outgoing, energetic, honest, and experienced, and able to work under pressure in a fast paced environment without sacrificing quality of service.

Must be able to pass a background check.

Cover letters and Resumes may be emailed to; [email protected]

Or for more information please TEXT;
513-295-3430
Or
513-290-6941

We look toward to hearing from you!

Today's Classical Woman Composer sadly died at the age of 25 from tuberculosis- but she still managed to make a lasting ...
03/13/2021

Today's Classical Woman Composer sadly died at the age of 25 from tuberculosis- but she still managed to make a lasting impact in her home country of France during those short 25 years she was alive.

Lili Boulanger

Born: August 21, 1893
Paris, France
Died: March 15, 1918
Mézy-sur-Seine, France
Nationality: French
Era: Modern

Lili Boulanger was born in 1893 in Paris, France to a musical family. Her mother, father, and sister Nadia were all trained composers or performers. When her father, Ernest, was only 20, he won the Prix de Rome. This coveted prize, which provided a year’s study in Rome, was the greatest recognition a young French composer could attain. Other winners of this prestigious award include Hector Berlioz, Gabriel Fauré, and Claude Debussy. Ernest Boulanger was 62 when he married a Russian princess. He was 72 years old when Nadia was born and 79 when Lili was born. He died when both children were still young. Lili’s immense talent was recognized early on, and at the age of 2 she began receiving musical training from her mom and eventually her older sister.

In 1895 she contracted bronchial pneumonia, after which she was constantly ill. Because of her frail health, she relied entirely on private study since she was too weak to obtain a full music education at the Conservatoire.

In 1913, Lili became the first woman to win the Prix de Rome for her Cantata Faust et Helene at the age of 20, the same age her father was when he won this award. Her phenomenal success made international headlines. Due to her quick rise to fame, she signed a contract with Ricordi that offered her an annual income in return for the right of first refusal on publication of her compositions. While in Rome, she finished several compositions including the song cycle, Clairières dans le ciel. Her study in Rome was cut short by the outbreak of World War I. Upon her return to Paris, she founded an organization which offered material and moral support to musicians fighting in the war.

In 1916 she returned to Rome to finish her study and began working on her five-act opera La princesse Maleine, as well as her large-scale settings of Psalms 129 and 130. This time a rapid decline in her health forced her to leave Rome and return to France. In the final two years of her life she concentrated her energy on finishing the compositions she had begun in Rome.

During her short life, she wrote many beautiful and complexly constructed pieces, including an unfinished opera. She had to dictate her last work, a Pie Jesu, to Nadia, because she was too weak to write. Lili Boulanger died of tuberculosis at the age of 25.

Lili BoulangerBorn:        August 21, 1893              Paris, FranceDied:         March 15, 1918              Mézy-sur-...
03/13/2021

Lili Boulanger

Born: August 21, 1893
Paris, France
Died: March 15, 1918
Mézy-sur-Seine, France
Nationality: French
Era: Modern

Lili Boulanger was born in 1893 in Paris, France to a musical family. Her mother, father, and sister Nadia were all trained composers or performers. When her father, Ernest, was only 20, he won the Prix de Rome. This coveted prize, which provided a year’s study in Rome, was the greatest recognition a young French composer could attain. Other winners of this prestigious award include Hector Berlioz, Gabriel Fauré, and Claude Debussy. Ernest Boulanger was 62 when he married a Russian princess. He was 72 years old when Nadia was born and 79 when Lili was born. He died when both children were still young. Lili’s immense talent was recognized early on, and at the age of 2 she began receiving musical training from her mom and eventually her older sister.

In 1895 she contracted bronchial pneumonia, after which she was constantly ill. Because of her frail health, she relied entirely on private study since she was too weak to obtain a full music education at the Conservatoire.

In 1913, Lili became the first woman to win the Prix de Rome for her Cantata Faust et Helene at the age of 20, the same age her father was when he won this award. Her phenomenal success made international headlines. Due to her quick rise to fame, she signed a contract with Ricordi that offered her an annual income in return for the right of first refusal on publication of her compositions. While in Rome, she finished several compositions including the song cycle, Clairières dans le ciel. Her study in Rome was cut short by the outbreak of World War I. Upon her return to Paris, she founded an organization which offered material and moral support to musicians fighting in the war.

In 1916 she returned to Rome to finish her study and began working on her five-act opera La princesse Maleine, as well as her large-scale settings of Psalms 129 and 130. This time a rapid decline in her health forced her to leave Rome and return to France. In the final two years of her life she concentrated her energy on finishing the compositions she had begun in Rome.

During her short life, she wrote many beautiful and complexly constructed pieces, including an unfinished opera. She had to dictate her last work, a Pie Jesu, to Nadia, because she was too weak to write. Lili Boulanger died of tuberculosis at the age of 25.

Lili Boulanger

Born: August 21, 1893
Paris, France
Died: March 15, 1918
Mézy-sur-Seine, France
Nationality: French
Era: Modern

Lili Boulanger was born in 1893 in Paris, France to a musical family. Her mother, father, and sister Nadia were all trained composers or performers. When her father, Ernest, was only 20, he won the Prix de Rome. This coveted prize, which provided a year’s study in Rome, was the greatest recognition a young French composer could attain. Other winners of this prestigious award include Hector Berlioz, Gabriel Fauré, and Claude Debussy. Ernest Boulanger was 62 when he married a Russian princess. He was 72 years old when Nadia was born and 79 when Lili was born. He died when both children were still young. Lili’s immense talent was recognized early on, and at the age of 2 she began receiving musical training from her mom and eventually her older sister.

In 1895 she contracted bronchial pneumonia, after which she was constantly ill. Because of her frail health, she relied entirely on private study since she was too weak to obtain a full music education at the Conservatoire.

In 1913, Lili became the first woman to win the Prix de Rome for her Cantata Faust et Helene at the age of 20, the same age her father was when he won this award. Her phenomenal success made international headlines. Due to her quick rise to fame, she signed a contract with Ricordi that offered her an annual income in return for the right of first refusal on publication of her compositions. While in Rome, she finished several compositions including the song cycle, Clairières dans le ciel. Her study in Rome was cut short by the outbreak of World War I. Upon her return to Paris, she founded an organization which offered material and moral support to musicians fighting in the war.

In 1916 she returned to Rome to finish her study and began working on her five-act opera La princesse Maleine, as well as her large-scale settings of Psalms 129 and 130. This time a rapid decline in her health forced her to leave Rome and return to France. In the final two years of her life she concentrated her energy on finishing the compositions she had begun in Rome.

During her short life, she wrote many beautiful and complexly constructed pieces, including an unfinished opera. She had to dictate her last work, a Pie Jesu, to Nadia, because she was too weak to write. Lili Boulanger died of tuberculosis at the age of 25.

Amy BeachBorn:     September 5, 1867            Henniker, New HampshireDied:     December 27, 1944            New York C...
03/11/2021

Amy Beach

Born: September 5, 1867
Henniker, New Hampshire
Died: December 27, 1944
New York City, New York
Nationality: American
Era: Romantic/21st-Century

Amy Beach was born to a distinguished New England family. A child prodigy, she could sing over 40 songs at the age of one and improvise alto lines at two. She began performing small piano recitals in the Boston area at the age of 6 and she gave her concert debut with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1883. She considered going to Europe to train at a conservatory but decided to remain in the United States.

After her marriage in 1885 to Dr. Henry Harris Aubrey Beach (a physician and lecturer at Harvard), she stopped most of her public performances. She would, however, give one public recital a year, where she would collect money from her friends and family to donate to charity. It was after she stopped performing that she turned her musical energy to composition.

A member of the Second New England School, her music was extremely influential in the development of the American classical music style. She was highly disciplined in her work, able to churn out a large-scale composition in just a few days. Her most popular (and profitable) compositions were her art songs, though she goes down in history as the first American woman to have a symphony performed by a major orchestra. Much of her music reflects her Anglo-American heritage and the Irish population in New England.

Aside from composition and performance, she was active in musical organizations, serving as the leader of the Music Educators National Conference and was the co-founder and first president of the Society of American Women Composers.

Amy Beach

Born: September 5, 1867
Henniker, New Hampshire
Died: December 27, 1944
New York City, New York
Nationality: American
Era: Romantic/21st-Century

Amy Beach was born to a distinguished New England family. A child prodigy, she could sing over 40 songs at the age of one and improvise alto lines at two. She began performing small piano recitals in the Boston area at the age of 6 and she gave her concert debut with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1883. She considered going to Europe to train at a conservatory but decided to remain in the United States.

After her marriage in 1885 to Dr. Henry Harris Aubrey Beach (a physician and lecturer at Harvard), she stopped most of her public performances. She would, however, give one public recital a year, where she would collect money from her friends and family to donate to charity. It was after she stopped performing that she turned her musical energy to composition.

A member of the Second New England School, her music was extremely influential in the development of the American classical music style. She was highly disciplined in her work, able to churn out a large-scale composition in just a few days. Her most popular (and profitable) compositions were her art songs, though she goes down in history as the first American woman to have a symphony performed by a major orchestra. Much of her music reflects her Anglo-American heritage and the Irish population in New England.

Aside from composition and performance, she was active in musical organizations, serving as the leader of the Music Educators National Conference and was the co-founder and first president of the Society of American Women Composers.

Todays Classical Woman Composer feature is Ohioan Julia Perry!This phenomenal woman was born in Lexington, KY, but grew ...
03/11/2021

Todays Classical Woman Composer feature is Ohioan Julia Perry!

This phenomenal woman was born in Lexington, KY, but grew up, and died in Akron, Ohio. Sadly there are few recordings of her work, but recently (this past November) the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra performed her composition "HOMUNCULUS C.F." for Percussion Ensemble, with Harp and Piano.

Julia Perry

Born: March 25, 1924
Lexington, KY
Died: April 29, 1979
Akron, OH
Nationality: American
Era: Modern

Julia Amanda Perry was an American classical composer and teacher who combined European classical and neo-classical training with her African-American heritage. Some of Julia Perry’s early compositions are heavily influenced by African American music. In 1951 Free at Last and I’m a Poor Li’l Orphan were published; both examples of how her compositional style incorporates black spiritual music. She also composed Song of Our Savior for the Hampton Institute Choir, which used Dorian mode and a hummed ostinato with call and response phrases throughout the piece.

In other works, Perry began branching out in her composition technique and experimenting with dissonance. One of her most notable works, Stabat Mater (1951), is composed for solo contralto and string orchestra.It incorporates dissonance, but remains within the classification of tonal music. These pieces incorporate more modern composition techniques, such as quartal voicings, which voices the orchestra in fourths rather than the traditional method of thirds and fifths. The work is constructed in sections and is very emotionally powerful. It was recorded on CRI, by the Japan Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, William Strickland, conducting.

Other instrumental works by Julia Perry include Requiem for Orchestra (also known as Homage to Vivaldi because of themes inspired by composer Antonio Vivaldi), a number of shorter orchestral works; several types of chamber music; a violin concerto; twelve symphonies; and two piano concertos. Her vocal works include a three-act opera and The Symplegades, which was based on the 17th century Salem witchcraft panic. The opera took more than ten years to write. She also composed an operatic ballet with her own libretto, based on Oscar Wilde’s fable The Selfish Giant, and in 1976 composed Five Quixotic Songs for bass baritone in and Bicentennial Reflections for tenor solo in ’77.

Julia Perry’s early compositions focused mostly on works written for voice, however, she gradually began to write more instrumental compositions later in life. By the time she suffered from a stroke in 1971, she had written twelve symphonies.

Julia Perry

Born: March 25, 1924
Lexington, KY
Died: April 29, 1979
Akron, OH
Nationality: American
Era: Modern

Julia Amanda Perry was an American classical composer and teacher who combined European classical and neo-classical training with her African-American heritage. Some of Julia Perry’s early compositions are heavily influenced by African American music. In 1951 Free at Last and I’m a Poor Li’l Orphan were published; both examples of how her compositional style incorporates black spiritual music. She also composed Song of Our Savior for the Hampton Institute Choir, which used Dorian mode and a hummed ostinato with call and response phrases throughout the piece.

In other works, Perry began branching out in her composition technique and experimenting with dissonance. One of her most notable works, Stabat Mater (1951), is composed for solo contralto and string orchestra.It incorporates dissonance, but remains within the classification of tonal music. These pieces incorporate more modern composition techniques, such as quartal voicings, which voices the orchestra in fourths rather than the traditional method of thirds and fifths. The work is constructed in sections and is very emotionally powerful. It was recorded on CRI, by the Japan Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, William Strickland, conducting.

Other instrumental works by Julia Perry include Requiem for Orchestra (also known as Homage to Vivaldi because of themes inspired by composer Antonio Vivaldi), a number of shorter orchestral works; several types of chamber music; a violin concerto; twelve symphonies; and two piano concertos. Her vocal works include a three-act opera and The Symplegades, which was based on the 17th century Salem witchcraft panic. The opera took more than ten years to write. She also composed an operatic ballet with her own libretto, based on Oscar Wilde’s fable The Selfish Giant, and in 1976 composed Five Quixotic Songs for bass baritone in and Bicentennial Reflections for tenor solo in ’77.

Julia Perry’s early compositions focused mostly on works written for voice, however, she gradually began to write more instrumental compositions later in life. By the time she suffered from a stroke in 1971, she had written twelve symphonies.

Address

210 W 14th St
Cincinnati, OH
45202

Cincinnati Bell Connector is half a block from the Music Hall stop

General information

Hotel is always open. Breakfast is included daily for our hotel guests; Service Hours: Monday-Friday: 7am-9am Saturday & Sunday: 9am-11am The Restaurant and Bar/Lounge is open on Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Restaurant Hours: Thursday: 5pm-10pm Friday/Saturday: Dinner 5-10pm Sunday: 4pm-9pm Live Jazz Music Every: Thursday: 7pm-10pm Friday & Saturday: 8pm-11pm Sunday: 6pm-9pm

Opening Hours

Friday 17:00 - 23:00
Saturday 17:00 - 23:00

Telephone

+15137213353

Specialties

  • Dinner

Products

Our HOTEL Offers:

9 Boutique Hotel Rooms; each named after Famed Classical Composers;
Mozart, Bach, Rachmaninov, Brahms, Beethoven, Schubert, Mahler, Beach, & Copland.

All rooms are individually, and uniquely, decorated, with beautiful period antiques, original works of art, and musical artifacts and memorabilia about the composer and in the style of the era in which they lived.


Our RESTAURANT Offers:

Full Service Restaurant, Bar & Jazz Lounge
Open: Fridays & Saturdays
Dinner Service: 5pm-10:30pm
Bar & Jazz Lounge: 5pm-11pm
Live Jazz Trios in Jazz Lounge: 7:30pm-11pm

Seasonal Menu Offerings Include:
2, 3 and 5 Course Meals
Appetizers
Hand Crafted Cocktails, Our Wall of Bourbon, A Diverse and Extensive Wine List, & Local Craft Beers.

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Comments

Management is terrible. I saw the manager kick a homeless person and call him the "n" word.
Excited to travel to Atlanta for Southern Conference on Language Teaching!
Only one more week until #DoorsOpenOTR, and we're really looking forward to seeing your beautifully themed hotel rooms! We hope you're excited too! #Cincinnati #architecture #walkingtour #OTR